MTHFR part 7: Folate Cycle continues… Citric Acid Cycle

Please note: The content of this post is my own, unless the technical terms is too hard to explain, then the content is copy and pasted. I am not a medical professional and thus the post is my point of view. But the content is science-based and credible. Just because it is a new science, does not necessarily make it quackery. 

The Power House: The Citric Acid or Kreb’s Cycle

The Citric Acid or Kreb’s Cycle happens inside the Mitochondria – inside your cells. Here the conversion of all dietary nutrients are turned into energy. Depending on digestive function, diet, rate of absorption and the presence of any genetic quirks, a problem can occur at any point of the cycle, which may lead to significant metabolic imbalances in the body’s chemistry as well as mitochondrial disorders.

If ACAT is lessen or missing,especailly when overloaded by the NOS, MTHFR,BHMT and CBS, activity in other areas can slow down causing:

  1. More B12 depletion
  2. Cholesterol and fatty acid imbalance
  3. Decreasing Bile salts and taurine production as well as poor cell wall function
  4. Poor breakdown of fats, carbohydrates and proteins to fuel other cells, nerves, tissue and organs.
  5. Rising oxalate levels
  6. Co Q10 reduction
  7. Limited energy for the Urea Cycle and Methionine Cycle

Part of this cycle is the Oxalate Production. Form more on that you can click here. Oxalates are anti-nutrients that interfere with the absorption of minerals, especially calcium and magnesium. Oxalates are found in foods that are normally regarded as healthy. Kale, chard, and other leafy greens are all high in oxalates. So, high oxalate content and the inability to pass the oxalic acid through the urine means that you are not properly absorbing calcium and magnesium, as well as other minerals such as zinc and iron. This can mean not only possible kidney stones, brain fog, and fatigue…but a long list of other potential problems, including fibromyalgia, frequent urinary tract infections, inflammatory bowel disease, hypothyroidism, osteoporosis, asthma and several other symptoms that arise from too many oxalates.

If you are interested in learning more f this cycle, click here for a short video on Khan Academy. Or the notes, click here.

This brings us to the end of the Folic Acid Cycle an very important cycle. This cycle happens at the same time as the Methionine Cycle, which we touched a little bit in the beginning.

Here’s to the New Year!

On the eve of the new school year, we are excited about what tomorrow will bring…

… to what the rest of the year will bring, and that it would be a good year.

We ended 2017 by saying goodbye to Alex’s teacher, Sindy Furley, as Broad Horizons Academy closed its doors one last time. Alex does not realize it yet, he does not comprehend what has happened yet, but I hope that he will soon learn to realize emotions like loss and sadness. But he has grown a lot, in many ways.

So what is happening tomorrow?

Tomorrow is a new school with new friends and old friends.

Very excited for the new opportunities for Alex to experience.

And then later this year he might even get to go to Big School.

MTHFR part 6: Folate Cycle continues… Urea Cycle

Please note: The content of this post is my own, unless the technical terms is too hard to explain, then the content is copy and pasted. I am not a medical professional and thus the post is my point of view. But the content is science-based and credible. Just because it is a new science, does not necessarily make it quackery. 

Urea Cycle – The Waste Facility

The the main and most important purpose of the Urea Cycle, also know as the Krebs-Henselein cycle is to remove ammonia from the body. the process mostly takes part in the liver and the kidneys. Ammonia is very toxic and even the smallest amount can cause serious damage.

This is also your CBS part of the MTHFR.

Sticking to the analogy of this cycle being like a waste management facility, power is received from the power plant (mitochondria), the previous cycle BH4 share their facility for the urea cycle to clean out the ammonia. This generous supply by BH4 also allows NOS (Waste Management Super) to make nitric oxide. Nitric Oxide maintains blood vessels throughout the whole body preventing plaque to build up which can lead to strokes and other heart conditions.

Looking at Alex’s results on CBS:

Now, if your CBS is not working properly and the “waste” spills over to form free radical of which Super Oxide and Peroxynitrate is the most destructive to healthy cells. This can cause the following defects:

  • N-Acetylglutamate synthase deficiency (Hyperammonemia, type 111 or NAGS deficiency: inherit disorder that causes ammonia to build up in the Blood, link)
  • Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase deficiency (congenital Hyperammonemia, type 1: link)
  • Ornithine transcarbamoylase deficiency (OTC deficieny: link)
  • Citrullinemia (Deficiency of argininosuccinic acid synthase: link)
  • Argininosuccinic aciduria (Deficiency of argininosuccinic acid lyase: link)
  • Argininemia (Deficiency of arginase: link)
  • Hyperornithinemia, hyperammonemia, homocitrullinuria syndrome (Deficiency of the mitochondrial ornithine transporter: link)

Most urea cycle disorders are associated with hyperammonemia, however argininemia and some forms of argininosuccinic aciduria do not present with elevated ammonia.

One of the most common conditions for a defective urea cycle is Gout. The build-up of uric acid causes inflammation and pain in the joint tissue. Uric acid is produced when the body breaks down a chemical called purine. Purine occurs naturally in your body, but it’s also found in certain foods. Uric acid is eliminated from the body in urine.

So, what food can you eat to lower purines and ammonia in your body:

Lastly the Citric Acid Cycle….